JEZZA'S JOTTINGS

Random thoughts, photos, quotes and enthusiasms from a book publisher and man about town

bellobooks:

The next of my favourite books to come through the office during our first year is this fantastic edition of Pamela Hansford Johnson’s Catherine Carter. A love story set in the world of Victorian theatre, it’s a great escapist read and fantastically well written.

bellobooks:

This is a great one. It’s a normal beach scene: sea, sand, bucket, spade and… HAND!
Death of a Warrior Queen is another classic mystery featuring Detective-Inspector Ben Jurnet.

bellobooks:

This is a great one. It’s a normal beach scene: sea, sand, bucket, spade and… HAND!

Death of a Warrior Queen is another classic mystery featuring Detective-Inspector Ben Jurnet.

Thanks to Rob!
cjwho:

Street Art in Dublin

bellobooks:

A fabulous original edition of Josephine Bell’s Death At The Medical Board, which was a Christmas present from Margaret to Joy in 1944 and has EXACTLY the same number of words as a pre-war edition, despite being slimmer.

bellobooks:

It’s still Pamela Hansford Johnson centenary week so here’s a classic cover for her novel Night and Silence, Who Is Here? which brings back Matthew Pryar from The Unspeakable Skipton as well as Dorothy Merlin, the celebrated and awful poetess whom Pryar is writing about.

bellobooks:

It’s still Pamela Hansford Johnson centenary week so here’s a classic cover for her novel Night and Silence, Who Is Here? which brings back Matthew Pryar from The Unspeakable Skipton as well as Dorothy Merlin, the celebrated and awful poetess whom Pryar is writing about.

BelloBooks: Francis Durbridge

bellobooks:

A new production of Francis Durbridge’s 1947 detective serial, Paul Temple and Steve, has just finished on BBC Radio 4 this week. Created in 1938, Durbridge wrote 20 serials featuring Temple for the radio, beginning with Send For Paul Temple, and he was also the star of his own TV series…

bellobooks:

What I like to call Pamela Hansford Johnson’s ‘Good’ series. This is not a comment on the books, although they are more than good, but the easiest way to refer to them as a pair!

'After some weeks’ association with Albert I decided that he did not in any way measure up to the popular estimation of what a lion should be. He was sulky, blustery and devoid of any finer feelings whatsoever. His small, golden eyes always had in them an expression of baffled rage; it seemed that he was trying to uphold his race’s reputation for fierceness but could not remember why. There was always a faintly puzzled look about him, as though he were wondering whether it was necessary to behave in this way. When he was not prowling about in a filthy temper he was indulging in his ‘joke’ of jumping out suddenly at unsuspecting passers-by and getting a sardonic pleasure out of their panic.'